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Old 10-19-2017, 03:01 PM   #1
craftsman70
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Default Passlock bypass for Remote Starter

2000 (Gen3) SL1
I'd like to install my own remote starter, but haven't been able to tell specifically how to get around the Passlock. On one hand I see forsale various 'universal bypass' type devices and on the other I've heard I can just bypass it with a resistor. My idea was I was going to tap in and check the resistance on passlock lines at the key cylinder and then I was going to insert a resistor of the same value into the line.

I looked at the wiring diagrams and figured the resistor bypass would work until I came across this line in the service manuals "The security resistor is bypassed under a tamper condition (possible external magnet applied to sensor). In this mode, a specific V-code is supplied to the BCM. The vehicle will not start in this mode."

So it sounds like they have added some logic to check for a magnet being used to fool the system. But how are they checking for it?

Can anyone point me in the right direction for either bypassing it myself or a specific recommendation for remote starter with bypass module that I can install myself?

Oh, and if it makes any difference, I do have a Tech2 available to use.

Last edited by craftsman70; 10-19-2017 at 03:07 PM..

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Old 10-19-2017, 10:48 PM   #2
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Default Re: Passlock bypass for Remote Starter

From the service manual for model year 2000 Saturn SL1/SC1/SW1;

SECURITY SYSTEM
The passlock sensor is powered by circuit 1459. The passlock sensor is grounded by circuit 1835. Passlock sensor data is supplied to the BCM by circuit 1836.

The passlock sensor data supplied to the BCM is in the form of V-codes or voltage codes. When the proper ignition key is turned in the ignition switch, the correct V-code is supplied to the BCM. The BCM responds by sending a serial data password to the engine controller allowing the engine to run.

Under a tamper condition, a specific V-code is supplied to the BCM. The BCM will send a class II message to the PCM disabling the fuel injectors.


For whatever reason, the service manual for 2000 Saturn SL1/SC1/SW1 did not include a technical explanation of Passlock. If I'm not mistaken, model year 2001 Saturn SL1/SC1/SW1 use Passlock and the same wiring. Suffice it to state the above description is exactly as described for model year 2001. the following is the theft deterrent description from 2001 and applies to 2000, your car.

Passlock

The passlock system is a vehicle theft deterrent system which deters drive-away vehicle theft by disabling engine operation if the ignition lock cylinder is not rotated with the proper mechanically cut key.

The passlock system is made up of an ignition switch assembly, passlock sensor, body control module (BCM), instrument panel cluster (IPC), and a powertrain control module (PCM).

The ignition switch contains a magnet mounted on the lock cylinder and a passlock sensor assembly which consists of security hall effect sensor, tamper hall effect sensor, and output resistors. A drill proof metal shield is also staked over the sensor housing.

The passlock sensor mounted to the ignition switch assembly is located inside the upper right side of the steering column. The passlock sensor contains two hall effect sensors: a tamper hall effect sensor and a security hall effect sensor. The tamper hall effect sensor is mounted on top of the security hall effect sensor. Should someone attempt to defeat the system by use of magnetic experimentation, the tamper hall effect sensor will activate first.

The BCM has the passlock controller integrated into it which controls the majority of the security systems logic. The BCM reads the data from the passlock sensor continuously. If the data is correct and has been received by the BCM within a specified time, the BCM will send a coded password to the PCM. The PCM will then allow the fuel injectors to operate.

The coded password for the security system is sent from the body control module to the PCM via the class 2 data link. If the password is correct and received within the specified time, the PCM will allow the fuel injectors to operate.

The IPC contains the security telltale. The security telltale has three modes of operation, OFF, FLASHING, and ON.

SECURITY TELLTALE will be off if:

*Ignition is in the OFF position
*Ignition is in the RUN, START, or ACC position and security system diagnostics have all PASSED

SECURITY TELLTALE will be on if:

*The BCM is performing a bulb check at vehicle start
*Security system diagnostics have not yet completed at vehicle start
*A security system diagnostic trouble code (DTC) is set in the BCM or PCM

SECURITY TELLTALE will be flashing if:

*The tamper hall effect sensor has been triggered
*Incorrect passlock sensor data to BCM for more than 5 seconds during vehicle start
*No passlock sensor data to the BCM for more than 5 seconds during vehicle start
*Incorrect password from the BCM to the PCM after 5 seconds during vehicle start

System Operation

The passlock system is designed to prevent vehicle operation if the mechanical key is not used to start the vehicle. The mechanical key, in normal operation, will turn the passlock lock cylinder. The passlock sensor (which is mounted to the passlock lock cylinder assembly) sends data by circuit 1836 to the body control module (BCM). The passlock sensor is powered by circuit 1459 from the BCM. The passlock sensor is grounded by circuit 1835 to the BCM. The BCM determines the validity of the passlock sensor data within a preset time window based on ignition switch input. The BCM will then send a coded password to the PCM by class II, circuit 1807. When the PCM receives the correct code, it will allow the fuel injectors to operate normally.


There are several ways to address diy wiring to add remote start; (a)using a bypass module that allows temporarily bypassing security for remote starting while providing security if a theft attempt is made while the engine's running or (b)cutting a wire in the Passlock sensor.

The security description is needed to understand what's required to retain Passlock security while using either factory or aftermarket remote start systems. Aftermarket remote start installers will install remote start but retain Passlock for ultimate protection. You can choose to wire your remote start the same way or disable Passlock permanently (no theft protection)

Bypassing Passlock permanently by cutting the white wire of the Passlock sensor. Some have done this to rid themselves of Passlock problems. The security light will remain on all the time - Passlock detected a system failure (cut white wire) and disables itself from interfering with everyday starting, no longer providing theft protection.

From my understanding of Passlock, its never fully disabled as it resides as a program in the bcm. Passlock will disable itself but never goes away like pulling a fuse. I do not know if GM's Tech II can disable Passlock if you do not want Passlock operation. Nothing in service manuals describe procedures to disable Passlock permanently.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg FIGURE Passlock System Schematic.jpg (110.3 KB, 3 views)

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Old 10-19-2017, 10:53 PM   #3
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Default Re: Passlock bypass for Remote Starter

Quote:
Originally Posted by craftsman70 View Post
2000 (Gen3) SL1
I'd like to install my own remote starter, ...
Oh, and if it makes any difference, I do have a Tech2 available to use.
Each remote starter manufacturer provides a specific passlock bypass wiring system to allow starting the car. This is a remote manufacturer specific bypass. You have to go to each manufacturer and see what they have available and its features. There is no generic simple complete bypass of the passlock.

Locate this GM Truck Group bulletin: UI BULLETIN # 26 this is how the remote bypass is wired into the GM trucks.

More below.

Last edited by OldNuc; 10-19-2017 at 11:00 PM..

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Old 10-19-2017, 11:01 PM   #4
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Default Re: Passlock bypass for Remote Starter

More.

The Truth about PASSLOCK by Rob Painter, ASE,CFL,CFEI


Applications: 1998-2005 GM Truck, SUVs, Hummer, 1997-1999 Buick Skylark, 1999-2004 Cadillac Escalade, GM Astro Vans,1996-2003 Chevy Cavaliers, Pontiac Vibe, Grand Am and many other GM vehicles……..
Over the last year I have found many problems with this factory installed anti-theft system. PASS LOCK is known commonly to locksmiths in the insurance industry as MRD (Magnetic Rotation Device). It is quite common for the examiner inspecting a vehicle with such a system to ASSUME that this system is very effective against theft.
This system is controlled only by the rotation of the ignition lock cylinder. If the ignition lock can be rotated, that is the end of all security aspects of this system.
By design, if the ignition lock is ripped from the housing the magnetic field is broken. By design if the ignition lock cylinder is force rotated with a tool such as a screwdriver the magnet in the ignition lock is supposed to be damaged and in turn the engine will not start due to the fact, that the vehicle’s computer will not be able to read the rotation of the ignition lock. As stated, this is by design and is not what actually happens in real life. The ignition lock in some cases can be force rotated and the engine will run.
Another consideration on this style lock in GM trucks was a production problem. In 2000 there was a bulletin out stating that it was common for the ignition lock to hang up making rotation of the lock with a key difficult. The correction from the lock manufacturer was to leave out the second and third wafers (tumblers) from these GM 10 cut locks which employed 9 wafers. Now you have only 7 wafers in this lock. The wafers for these locks only came with 4 heights and differed by .025 of an inch. In contrast in order to understand hall small a tolerance this is: A human hair is from .004 to .007 of an inch. Put 4 to five human hairs together one on top of each other and you come to about .025 of an inch. By design these wafers were in what would be considered half cuts. In other words a 3 cut on the key would operate a 4 cut wafer or a 2 cut wafer. Taking wear into consideration, there is a whole combination of 10 cut keys that would operate this lock.
I was involved in a case where a Forensic Locksmith working for the insurance company was dispatched to examine a reported stolen vehicle that had no ignition lock present. In such a case, different hypotheses could not be ruled out because the ignition lock was not present. When examined, the expert attempted to start the engine by jumping the ignition switch wiring. His report stated that the PASS LOCK system was enabled causing the engine not to start. This is what he found when examining the vehicle once recovered without the ignition lock and switch assembly. The problem here is although the PASS LOCK was working at the time of his examination, unless he had the lock and wafers to examine under a microscope, there is no way he could come to the conclusion as to how the vehicle was last operated. A jury also found this to be true and awarded for the insured. Plaintiff Counsel went back to the judge for a consumer fraud issue and was awarded treble damages. The ignition key for the PASS LOCK system is a common ordinary key blank. It has no security chip embedded in it. The security or “R” code is built into the ignition lock assembly.
Duplicate ignition keys can be made at any hardware store.
When a locksmith looks at such a vehicle, it is very common for him to state service procedures as they relate to a theft. Thieves are not out there removing the lock and housing and spending the half hour programming it takes to steal the vehicle.
To service this style lock, there is a one in 10 chance that the correct lock with an electronic code is being installed. If the lock is not programmed in order for the vehicle’s computer to see the rotation of the lock, there is a process that needs to be followed to program the system if a Tech II scanner is not available.
Once replaced, the ignition lock cylinder must be left in the RUN position for 10 minutes. The ignition lock is turned to OFF and the process is repeated for another 10 minutes. The lock is then turned to OFF and the process of turning the ignition lock to ON for 10 more minutes is now repeated. The ignition lock is now programmed to start the engine.
The problem in this case using a locksmith to opine on the theft of a PASS LOCK equipped vehicle is that, this process is the only way known to him for stealing a PASS LOCK equipped vehicle. Thieves do not have the luxury of time that the locksmith does. A locksmith knows how to pick this lock. A locksmith knows how to impression a key. These methods all take time and yet the insertion of an incorrect key, or the possibility due to wear of the lock rotating without a key is still present.

I am seeing many Suburbans and like kind vehicles that are totally stripped (including the vehicle’s computer) where the locksmith is stating the vehicle could not be stolen because of this highly sophisticated system.
Many insurance experts from my experience are not aware of GM Bulletin# 26 (May of 1999) of how to defeat the PASSLOCK for remote start. This same process as defined in the bulletin can be used to over ride the PASS LOCK by a thief. The security light will stay on steady in the dash in this instance, but the engine will still run. One of the questions an insurance investigator must ask of the insured is: Were there any lights illuminated in the dash before the reported theft? If recovered burned and the insured in trying to help the investigator in the cause of the fire or theft, may say the security light was on before the theft. If this is the case; the system was not functioning properly before the fire and in that case, it should be considered a good steal.
It gets worse when the vehicle is totally burned. There are many out there that will make absolute statements regarding the security of this system.
In March of this year a locksmith was sent out to examine a burned Yukon to determine if it was stolen. The insured was charged criminally. The locksmith took an un-cut key blank and inserted it into the lock. He then impressioned the lock and made a key for it in order to start the engine. His conclusion was that there were no signs of tampering to the lock. This vehicle had minor burn damage on the interior. Soot had built up over the key lands (where the key goes when inserted into the lock). Since the locksmith inserted a key un-cut key blank into the lock, he had created new tool marks over riding the soot. He stated the lock showed no signs of tampering and yet he made a key for it! The prosecution’s case was dropped.
Then there was the locksmith that stated the 2002 Yukon revealed no signs of stripping. He had recovered 6 out of 9 wafers and stated that the other wafers must have been destroyed in the fire.

CONTINUED BELOW

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Old 10-19-2017, 11:02 PM   #5
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Default Re: Passlock bypass for Remote Starter

Continued from above.

He did not even consider that the other three wafers may have not been present before the fire. The vehicle had burn damage to the interior, but the paint was still present on the outside of the doors. There were no seats in this vehicle when it burned! The situation was settled before suit was brought against the insurance company.
At many seminars it will be stated by the experts that if the vehicle is equipped with a factory installed anti theft system, the vehicle can’t be stolen. In fact, there are insurance companies denying payment of theft claims on vehicles that were never recovered because that is what they are being taught by the experts in theft.

Since PASSLOCK has so many problems, a very thorough exam must be performed. All theories have to be ruled out until one fits. Examination of the wafers in the ignition lock as well as the total picture on theft has to be considered. A key should never be inserted into the lock because of potential spoliation of the evidence. The only way the last key used theory is going to work 100% of the time is when the key is already installed in the lock which can be very common when located at a body shop. Keys must be examined for duplication marks, but just because there are no such marks does not mean the key was not duplicated. Keys can be cut off of code. The codes are available by supplying a dealer with a VIN.
Other considerations in real life are wear. When the ignition lock has been used many times with a correctly cut key after time, the key will come out in any lock cylinder position. If the ignition lock is not put into the LOCK position, the lock can rotate without force and without a key and the engine will run. In order for the driver to make sure that steering column is locked (2000 and older equipped with a locking steering column) he would need to check the steering wheel for being locked each and every time when parked. In real life, that does not happen.
In California I have done an experiment more than once. I would have keys made off the VIN of a vehicle I had not seen. Then I would have 5 more keys made that were not close in cut. If they were held together, it was obvious they were keys of different cuts. I then went to California and tried all of these keys on these vehicles. They all worked the lock with no effort and the PASSLOCK equipped vehicle would start and run each and every time. If I were to remove the ignition lock from these vehicles and disassemble, chances are very good that I would see freshly made tool marks related to the use of one of the new improper cut keys.
In forensics, assumption should not be made. These locks and keys have to be examined under a microscope for newly made tool marks. If not, it is purely speculation on the part of your expert and you have the potential of losing a case.
Its one thing to know what happened. It’s quite another to prove what happened.
I have seen reports from the insurance experts on reported stolen and recovered totally burned. One such report on a PASS LOCK equipped vehicle that comes to mind from a “Forensic” report was this: “The steering column suffered extreme fire damage and the wafers to the ignition lock were not recovered. This means that the ignition lock was most probably forced from the steering column before the fire.” Since when is “Most probably” forensics? Even more interesting on this vehicle, the report stated the ignition lock side bar was located on the upper layer of driver’s floor burn debris. If this statement was true, that means “most probably” was an assumption.
The side bar is part of the ignition lock cylinder and since it was allegedly present in the top layer of burn debris, it means the ignition lock cylinder was in its factory designed location in the steering column at the time of the fire, because it was one of the last components to fall to the floor. Without having any wafers (tumblers) to examine, there is no way that a conclusion can be made as to how this PASS LOCK equipped vehicle was last operated. Instead of assuming the system was working at the time of the fire, the actual conclusion should have been undetermined because any type of lock rotation cannot be ruled out if the scientific method was used.
This is just a small sample as to how the last operation of a vehicle equipped with PASS LOCK can be refuted.
Will this system deter a joy rider who just ripped the lock out of the steering column? Yes. Is it the highly sophisticated electronic theft deterrent we have been told? As to the design? Yes. The total system is only as good as the ignition lock however. If the lock has flaws (which it does) all those flaws need to be taken into consideration before arriving to a conclusion as to how the vehicle was last operated. In 2001 and up on GM trucks the locking steering column was eliminated.
It is now common place to send out a locksmith to examine reported stolen GM trucks. Many of these trucks are completely stripped missing interiors, engine components and the like, but have no steering column/ignition damage. Since there is no damage to the column, it is assumed by the locksmith that the reported stolen vehicle was not stolen. It’s good to remember a locksmith (and he can be a very good locksmith) is limited to his experience as a locksmith when looking at these vehicles. Since the steering wheels no longer lock and it takes merely seconds to take the transmission out of gear, without having to unlock the transmission shifter interlock, these vehicles are much easier to steal than they once were by means of a tow truck. It is not necessary to use a flat bed. A tow truck with a wheel lift works wonders. Many GM truck parts are interchangeable over many years.


I had the opportunity to see an affidavit prepared by an expert regarding a PASS LOCK equipped reported stolen vehicle recovered burned.
He stated that a person would not risk his 30-40 thousand dollar tow truck to take a vehicle from a mall. Would you be asking the tow truck driver if he was stealing the vehicle or taking the vehicle for service? Of course not. Even if you did ask; how would you know he was telling the truth?
All this article is meant to do is to make you not take your expert’s conclusions for granted. Can he prove he eliminated different hypotheses before arriving to a conclusion?

For seminar information I can be contacted at rpainter@wi.rr.com and the website is at http://www.autotheftexpert.com

Rob Painter,ASE,CFL,CFEI
Forensic Vehicle Component Analyst

Diplomate, American Board of Forensic Examiners
ASE Certified Auto, Collision, Med/Hvy Duty Truck Technician
Certified Forensic Locksmith
Certified Fire and Explosion Investigator
Certified Vehicle Fire Investigator
Certified Forensic Auto Theft Examiner
Certified and Federal Court Qualified Auto Theft and Fraud Expert
As per federal court rules of evidence (702) (Daubert) my testimony has qualified me as:

Auto Theft and Fraud Expert
Forensic Vehicle Analyst
Fire Origin and Cause Expert



© Copyright 2005 Robert Painter. All rights reserved.

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Old 10-20-2017, 10:18 AM   #6
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Default Re: Passlock bypass for Remote Starter

Thanks for all the detailed information! Especially pointing me to the MG UI Bulletin#26.

One last questions then: If I go the method of just using a remote starter manufactures bypass, can anyone recommend a brand that is DIY friendly? When I was researching buying a remote starter, it seemed so many required 'programming' that only an authorized installer to could have access to.

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Old 10-20-2017, 11:08 AM   #7
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Default Re: Passlock bypass for Remote Starter

Quote:
Originally Posted by craftsman70 View Post
Thanks for all the detailed information! Especially pointing me to the MG UI Bulletin#26.

One last questions then: If I go the method of just using a remote starter manufactures bypass, can anyone recommend a brand that is DIY friendly? When I was researching buying a remote starter, it seemed so many required 'programming' that only an authorized installer to could have access to.
I got the Bulldog RS82-I https://www.amazon.com/Bulldog-RS82-...te+car+starter

Install was a piece of cake on my SL1 auto and works flawlessly. The range on the remote could be better though.

...
2000 Saturn SL1 (w/ DOHC) automatic - 257k

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Old 10-20-2017, 11:50 AM   #8
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Default Re: Passlock bypass for Remote Starter

Most of them are actually user programmable. Just find the 1 or 2 that interest you and then search up (google) the install & users manual and verify the programming instructions are present.

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Old 10-20-2017, 02:19 PM   #9
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Default Re: Passlock bypass for Remote Starter

craftsman70, one Vue member installed several Bulldog remote start systems in his fleet of Vues. I have a DEI remote start in my L300 but had it installed professionally - I use my Saturn remote to remote start without having to carry an extra remote. Passlock requires a 555 bypass module added to the remote start module. One site explains it; http://www.remotestartexperts.com/ab...e-modules.html. There are many sites to help but all you need to know for reference is your Saturn has Passlock (no rfid chip) and uses a plain ignition key. You're probably aware of other sites selling remote start systems for pro or diy installation.

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